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Saint-Charles-Garnier Church

Saint-Charles-Garnier church

On August 7, 1944, Cardinal Villeneuve decreed the creation of a new parish in Sillery, evoking the one-time presence of that missionary order there. It was placed under the patronage of Saint Charles Garnier, a XVIIth-century Jesuit. The architect Charles-A. Jean, a Holland Avenue resident, was commissioned to design the church with the assistance of Roland Dupéré. The crypt, inaugurated on August 25, 1946, was the site of divine services  until  All  Saints  Day  in 1947,  when  the new  church  was  inaugurated. It was solemnly blessed on May 21, 1950, upon completion of the interior décor.

Saint-Charles-GarnierChurch, a late example of the English Gothic Revival style, is considered one of the most magnificent structures built in the 1940s and 1950s. Its artistic treasures are a testimony to the revival of religious art during this pivotal period of religious architecture that preceded modernism in the 1960s. Although Saint-Charles-GarnierChurch is one of the last examples of this stylistic tradition, it convincingly interprets that tradition with its gargoyles that dominate the bell-tower’s battlements, its spire and its masonry.

On August 7, 1944, Cardinal Villeneuve decreed the creation of a new parish in Sillery, evoking the one-time presence of that missionary order there. It was placed under the patronage of Saint Charles Garnier, a XVIIth-century Jesuit. The architect Charles-A. Jean, a Holland Avenue resident, was commissioned to design the church with the assistance of Roland Dupéré. The crypt, inaugurated on August 25, 1946, was the site of divine services  until  All  Saints  Day  in 1947,  when  the new  church  was  inaugurated. It was solemnly blessed on May 21, 1950, upon completion of the interior décor.

Saint-Charles-GarnierChurch, a late example of the English Gothic Revival style, is considered one of the most magnificent structures built in the 1940s and 1950s. Its artistic treasures are a testimony to the revival of religious art during this pivotal period of religious architecture that preceded modernism in the 1960s. Although Saint-Charles-GarnierChurch is one of the last examples of this stylistic tradition, it convincingly interprets that tradition with its gargoyles that dominate the bell-tower’s battlements, its spire and its masonry.


The interior décor also evokes the Gothic Revival style with its conspicuous shallow arcade and the treatment of the choir and stalls. The triangular arches, with their more modern, well-crafted shapes, are made of contemporary materials: cement blocks coated to imitate cut stone combined with narrow, coloured cement blocks.  The space is organized so as to emphasize the premises’ functional aspect.

The furnishings and woodwork were created between 1949 and 1953 by Jean-Julien Bourgault, a sculptor in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli who is world-renowned for his works illustrating our folklore and scenes of everyday life and featuring religious imagery. The high altar, with its bas-relief depicting the death of the Parish’s patron saint, is flanked by adoring cherubs that stand almost as high as the altar. The Crucifix, a parishioner’s gift, is believed to have been sculpted by Médard Bourgault. 

Mistro also created mosaics for the Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré Basilica. The plaster Stations of the Cross are by M. Chantrel. The Saint Alphonse Chapel, designed by the architect Noël Mainguy, was added to the west side in 1957.

Spectacular stained glass windows, crafted by Rault Vitraux in Rennes, France, complete the church’s decoration. Two small, rectangular stained-glass windows on the external façade are the work of parishioner Marius Plamondon. The current 3-manual, 32-choir Casavant organ was installed in 1953.  

Attractions :
Mistro also created mosaics for the Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré Basilica. The plaster Stations of the Cross are by M. Chantrel. The Saint Alphonse Chapel, designed by the architect Noël Mainguy, was added to the west side in 1957.

Spectacular stained glass windows, crafted by Rault Vitraux in Rennes, France, complete the church’s decoration. Two small, rectangular stained-glass windows on the external façade are the work of parishioner Marius Plamondon. The current 3-manual, 32-choir Casavant organ was installed in 1953.  

Attractions :


The pulpit, surmounted by a canopy supporting a cherub holding a trumpet, consists of panels bearing the symbols of the Four Evangelists: a winged bull to symbolize Luke, a lion to represent Mark, a human-faced animal to represent Matthew and an eagle to symbolize John.

Walter del Mistro designed the altarpiece mosaics for the side altars (dedicated to Saint Anne and Saint Theresa of the Child Jesus) and the mosaics for the crossing (Saint Joseph and Our Lady of Perpetual Succor), based on drawings by Jean-Baptiste Soucy. 

  • Mosaics
  • Sculptures by Jean-Julien Bourgault
  • Stained glass windows

 

  • Mosaics
  • Sculptures by Jean-Julien Bourgault
  • Stained glass windows

 

Saint-Charles-Garnier Church

  • 1215, Avenue du Chanoine-Morel
  • Québec (Sainte-Foy), Québec
  • G1S 4B1
  • Phone: 418-681-8191
  • Fax:
  • Email:
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